Food Trucks: From Fad to Fixture

America’s current food craze isn’t so new, actually. Just go back to the summers of your youth when the only thing that could break up baseball matches or pool parties other than the voice of a mom was the ice cream truck’s sweet siren call rolling into your neighborhood.Learn more by visiting Grand Rapids Food Truck

With the exception of swapping kids with business professionals and moving the ice cream guy out for a gourmet chef, take the photo and you have food trucks heading to a town near you… if they haven’t already arrived.

Growing up in Morocco, Yassir Raouli possibly never heard the melody of an ice cream truck. But Raouli came up with a concept, Bistro Truck, that could take him to retirement after attempting several projects in New York City – waiting tables, managing night clubs and opening an online clothing store.

“I did research, and I wanted to start a restaurant. I always wanted to have my own place,” he says. “What made sense was the food truck.”

The food truck is just what it says it is, if you somehow haven’t caught on. In a truck or van, the whole restaurant, from the kitchen to the cash register, is self-contained. Owners of food trucks, who also act as cooks, drive customers to their restaurants instead of making people come to them. From there, you begin to notice distinctions.

There are food trucks that only cater to the lunch crowd, and some only cater to the rush for dinner; others do both. A lot of food trucks are nomadic, posting on sites such as Twitter and Facebook a week’s worth of locations and making them dependent on the Internet of their customers to direct them to their current locations. Others are parked every day at the same location in the same neighborhood, like Raouli’s service.

It is the importance placed on food quality that determines the new food truck wave. For decades, people have eaten street food in the United States – at hot dog carts in Chicago or brat stands in Boston – apart from the venerable ice cream guy. But clients around the nation have had the benefit of countless gastronomic choices over the last few years. There’s a Kosher Taco Truck in Los Angeles (Takosher). Four days a week, Kronic Krave Grill serves arepas from South America in downtown Austin, Texas. And, not surprisingly, with Kim Jong Grillin ‘, a Korean BBQ food truck named after the notorious North Korean tyrant, in Portland, Ore., owners stretched the politically correct limit.

Raouli says of the Bistro Truck menu, whose daily specials feature items such as chilled watermelon soup, kofta kebabs and strawberry panna cotta, “I think we kind of revolutionized it,” “We were one of the first to offer gourmet food.”

Contact Info

Gettin’ Fresh
2844 Eastern Ave SE, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49508
Phone Number 616.308.1177