Connecticut Bail Bonds Group Norwich- An Intro

There are four main types of bail bonds used in the industry; however, it can differ slightly, depending on the particular jurisdiction, city, and state that the bonding is taking place. The four most common heard-of bail bonds used to obtain a person’s release from jail are surety bonds, cash bonds, federal bonds, and immigration bonds. Each type of bond has a different method of releasing a person from jail. Continue reading to learn more about cash, surety, federal, and immigrations bonds; as well as, how to obtain one in your particular city or state. Get the facts about Connecticut Bail Bonds Group Norwich see this.

Cash Bonds

A cash bond is used in a situation when a defendant, friend, or family member requests to simply pay cash for their bail. Once the defendant completes the required probationary terms of their arrest, and shows up to all their court hearings, the money is returned in whole. This is not a recommended option because bail is usually thousands of dollars. This type of cash can be saved for more important or immediate needs; rather than using it to obtain a release from jail. This type of bond has been a popular choice for elite persons, celebrities, professional athletes, and other exclusive groups.

Surety Bonds

Surety bonds are another popular choice when it comes to obtaining a release from jail following an arrest. Surety bonds work like this: once a person is arrested and taken into custody, another person or themselves can contact a professional indemnitor, such as a bail bondsman, to assist in the bail process. These types of bail bonds usually include some form of collateral for the required bail amount. This is because the person being released on bail will most likely have ongoing court stipulations, such as drug testing and counseling, that must be completed or the indemnitor takes on the responsibility of the entire bail amount. So the personal signing for the bail bond will most likely have to pay a non-refundable fee (a percentage of the full bail amount) as the collateral. This form of bail bond is most popular among the general population.

Federal Bonds

These bonds are not as common as the ones mentioned above. This is because they are only used in the case of a federal crime. Crimes such as these include embezzlement, tax evasion, kidnapping, bank robbery, aircraft hi-jacking, counterfeiting, and more. These bonds, for good reason, are more expensive than the other common forms of bail bonds. Using a reputable and experienced bail bondsman for federal bonds is very beneficial and can make a big difference in a person’s bonding process.

Immigration Bonds

Immigration bonds sound self-explanatory. They are a little more complicated than the average person would think. They are extremely complicated because they are for crimes that involve foreign nationals and non-us citizens. They are expensive, just like federal bonds, because they require a bail bondsman to take on a great deal of risk. For examples, a person that is a citizen of Canada can commit a crime in the United States, then flee back to Canada once out on bail; leaving the bail bond agency responsible for the full bond (which can range from thousands to millions of dollars) because the defendant is not here to serve for their crimes.


Connecticut Bail Bonds Group Norwich Explained

Simply put: A bail bond is a contract between 4 entities:
-The bail bonding company
-The jurisdiction that holds your warrant (or court)
-The person co-signing for your bail.
-You – The Defendant

The bail agents, as well as the co-signers are the people who are responsible for you showing up for all of your court appearances. Now, you do have the option to pay the bond yourself, if you can afford it. The bail amount is set by the court and usually dependent on the severity of your crime and if you are deemed a flight risk. If you are a flight risk or try to escape, be sure an inmate search will be performed to find you and bring you to justice and you may not receive a bond at all. Get the facts about Connecticut Bail Bonds Group see this.

Big hint here: turning yourself in once you discover you are wanted on a warrant normally does not make you a flight risk… this may reduce your bond amount… check with your attorney.

The bail bond company provides a guarantee to the court that you will appear in court when summoned by the judge, ie; your next court date. You will also need to check in regularly with your bail agent as a condition of your release.

Money, in the form of a bond, is required by the court as a monetary incentive to release you and keep you, the defendant, from fleeing the area, or the country for that matter. The bail bond company then charges a fee for posting your bond – this amount varies from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. In most instances, the bond amount for a felony is normally 10% of the entire bond. So if you are placed on $100,000 bail your bond amount to pay the bail bond company would only be $10,000. This saves you from having to come up with the entire $100,000 yourself as most people could not afford this. Mind you, the $10,000 fee you paid to the bonding company you will not get back.

For a misdemeanor arrest, the bail bond company normally charges a 20% fee. So if you are arrested on a misdemeanor and your bond has been set at $2000 then you would only have to pay a bonding company $400. Again, you will not get this amount back – this is a fee. Although, check with your accountant, you may be able to write this amount off on your taxes for the coming year.

Collateral is typically required on large bonds to ensure you will not skip the the case and head for Mexico. Normally a bonding company will have your co-signor sign a note (contract) stating they will give up collateral worth the amount of the bond and any other fees. This could be their car, boat or even their home. So if you have a bond that is $100,000 and you decide to skip town, your co-signor is on the hook for the other $90,000 plus any applicable fees.

The system is designed to keep you around to complete the judicial case. Usually it works and often, you have seen the shows, some people abscond and attempt to flee. But, once a warrant is written – that warrant never goes away, until you are brought in front of a judge to answer those charges. There are of course manuals and publications that describe in complete detail the bail bonding process and how to turn yourself in properly.

A good bondsman will take down all of your vitals (height, weight, date of birth, where you hang out, what you drive, where you work, etc). The bondsman will also take a picture of you, any distinguishing marks and really get to know you before they fork over a bunch of money to the courts. Some will even go so far as to take a picture of your co-signor and get to know them and their property before releasing your bond.

If you fail to check in, or totally abscond (run away) and the bail agent or the co-signer are unable to locate you in time for trial, your co-signer is immediately responsible for the full amount of the bail. Once you are located and arrested by the bail agent or police department, the co-signer is responsible for all of the bail agent’s expenses while looking for you. All of this will be in the contract you and the co-signor have signed and must sign.

Remember, when dealing with a bondsman, don’t act out or talk brash. If the bondsman doesn’t think you will be coming back to court they have the opportunity to say no to your bail. They do not have to bond you. There is no law stating they have to bond you. So act accordingly.

If you are convicted there are certain steps you can take to flip the bond over for your appeal, this is all dependent on your bonding company and how you treated them. While you are waiting for your appeal in county jail or prison, remember you must also protect yourself, share your crime or charges with no one.

White collar, blue collar or no collar – when you go to prison you all go equally. Getting a good bondsmen is key to your freedom while fighting your charges. If you have an active warrant or simply need some advice before you turn yourself in, you should consult with a bail bondsmen to get all the facts about how bail bonds work in your state.